Save the elephants

B.C. man’s Google Elephant system
helps save elephants in Africa

Jake Wall, a PhD geography student at the University of British Columbia, helps put a satellite GPS tracking collar on an elephant in northern Kenya. Photo courtesy of Jake Wall

Jake Wall, a PhD geography student at the University of British Columbia, helps put a satellite GPS tracking collar on an elephant in northern Kenya.
(Photo courtesy of Jake Wall)

Level 3

Adapted from The Vancouver Sun

Jake Wall, a PhD student at UBC
in Vancouver, Canada, has invented
a device to help save elephants.
Wall tracks elephants by using
smartphones and Google Earth.
For 10 years, Wall has worked with
Save the Elephants in Kenya, East Africa.
He hopes his new invention
will help stop poaching.


Watch the YouTube video explaining how the new tracking system
in Kenya works:

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www.TheWestcoastReader.com©2012-2014 The Official Westcoast Reader

Duke and Sophie are best friends

Sophie sleeps on Duke. <br> (Photo courtesy of Richard Quiring, Wild Moon Organics)

Sophie sleeps on Duke.
(Photo courtesy of Richard Quiring, Wild Moon Organics)

Level 1

Adapted from Castanet.net

Duke lives on an organic farm
near Armstrong, B.C.
He is a big brown dog.
He is five years old.
The Quiring family owns the farm.
They raise pigs and cows.
Duke is the family’s pet.

An interesting story
A pig on their farm has babies.
She has 12 baby pigs or piglets.
One pig is very, very small.
This piglet is called a runt.
She cannot get milk from her mother.
Her brothers and sisters push her away.
Slowly the piglet gets weak.
She might die.


Listen to the story Duke and Sophie are best friends - Level 2 
Reading by: Nila Gopaul
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www.TheWestcoastReader.com©2012-2014 The Official Westcoast Reader

Celebrate International Literacy Day

Darius is teaching his nephew Ronnie to read English. Studies show that children who are read to learn language skills quickly

Darius is teaching his nephew Ronnie to read English. Studies show that children who are read to learn language skills quickly.
(Photo by Nancy Carson)

September 8 is International Literacy Day. Learn more at UNESCO.org

This story,
“Family, the first school for young children,”
first appeared on
WCR online
in January, 2013.

Adapted from The Vancouver Sun

Level 2

How does a child become a good reader?
How does a child become a good speaker?
The answer is simple.
The family is the first school for a child.
A child becomes a good reader because
people at home read to him. And read often.
A child learns to speak when family members talk with him.
Talk with him often. Young children learn language
from older members of the family.

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www.TheWestcoastReader.com©2012-2014 The Official Westcoast Reader