Baby owl rescued

baby-owl-rescue-from-wildfire

A baby owl was rescued from the Little Bobtail Lake wildfire in B.C.
Photo courtesy of B.C. Wildfire Management Branch

Baby owl rescued from forest fire
Adapted from cbc.ca by Nancy Carson
Level 1

Listen to “Baby owl rescued from forest fire”– Level 1
Reading by Jessica Heafey

A very large fire in B.C.
is now controlled.
The cool, wet weather
helped the firefighters.

The Little Bobtail Lake fire
started around May 9, 2015.
The fire was south of Prince George, B.C.
The fire burned 25 square kilometres of forest.

Cleaning up
Many people left their homes.
Firefighters put sprinklers around buildings.
The residents went to safe places.
About 220 firefighters are still in the area.
They are putting out some flames.
And they are cleaning up.
Fire crews are making the area safer.

A surprise
Firefighters found a baby owl
on the ground near the fire area.
The firemen named the owl Norman.
They found the baby near Norman Lake Road.

The baby owl is a Great Horned Owl.
The fire staff put the little owl
on a plane to Delta, B.C.

A Great Horned Owl called Casper is fostering owlets. Photo courtesy of O.W.L. Rehabilitation Society

A Great Horned Owl called Casper is fostering owlets.
Photo courtesy of O.W.L. Rehabilitation Society

O.W.L.
Orphaned Wildlife (O.W.L.) will care for
Norman for two to three months.
The O.W.L. staff will quickly
put him with a foster parent.
Then he will know he is an owl,
say the staff.

A Great Horned Owl called Betty Photo courtesy of O.W.L. Rehabilitation Society

A Great Horned Owl called Betty
Photo courtesy of O.W.L. Rehabilitation Society

A happy ending
O.W.L. staff will care for Norman.
Then they will return him to Prince George.
“He’s looking good,” says Martina Versteeg.
“He’s eating great….”
The staff say he will make a full recovery.

Did you know?
The Snowy Owl is the largest owl in North America.
The Great Horned Owl (GHO) is second in size.
The GHO is called a “hoot owl”
because of its call.
Listen to its call:

Vocalizations

Listen for the well known “Are you awake? Me too” call from three males.
Spring Vocalizations

  A selection from the above: this is the repetitive grunting used by males to attract females.
Male Coaxing

  Often produced by juveniles, this seems to be an exclamation of dismay and annoyance.
Whinny


Nestling Cries
Cries produced by nestlings when hungry.

  Ignoring the Chickadee that wanted some time in the spotlight, this is an adult male GHOW making a rare vocalization.
Bark
An Adult Great Horned Owl at the Reifel Migratory Bird Sanctuary in Delta, B.C. Photo by brendan.lally/CC, Wikimedia

An Adult Great Horned Owl at the Reifel Migratory Bird Sanctuary in Delta, B.C.
Photo by brendan.lally/CC, Wikimedia

Vocabulary:

  1. foster parent: a person or animal who looks after
    or brings up a child or young animal like a mother,
    in place of the natural mother
  2. flames: burning gas which makes a yellow light

Links:

  1. See where the baby owl will be in Delta, B.C.
  2. Visit the Reifel Migratory Bird Sanctuary in Delta, B.C.
  3. Information on B.C. wild fires
  4. Read the Westcoast Reader story “It’s a hoot on Grouse Mountain”.
  5. Read the Westcoast Reader story “Hungry snowy owls return to Tsawwassen”.

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