B.C. doctor

doctor-julio-montaner

Julio Montaner is an HIV/AIDS expert.
Photo by Mark van Manen/The Vancouver Sun

B.C. doctor
Adapted from The Vancouver Sun by Nila Gopaul

 Listen to “B.C. Doctor” – Level 1
Reading by Jessica Heafey

Julio* Montaner was born
in Argentina in 1956.
He came to B.C.
to study in the 1980s.
* Say – hoo-lee-oh

He worked at St. Paul’s Hospital.
There, Julio met his wife.
So he stayed in Canada.
And he became a doctor.
Continue reading

A healthy start to summer school

healthy-food-for-summer-school

Keira Thompson, left, and Stephanie Hai, are 10 years old.
Photo by Ric Ernst/The Province

A healthy start to summer school
Adapted from The Province by Nila Gopaul
Illustrations by Nola Johnston
Level one

Listen to “A healthy start to summer school” – Level 1
Reading by Nila Gopaul

Kiera Thompson and Stephanie Hai
are 10 years old.
They joined a cooking class
last summer.
They learned to make healthy foods,
such as sushi.

Back to school
Everyone is busy.
Parents are working.
Many students are in summer school.
It takes time to eat well.
It takes time to plan good meals.
Continue reading

Signs of a stroke

cross-section 400

The diagram shows what happens during a stroke. Illustration by Nola Johnston

Signs of a stroke, Level 3
Adapted from The Vancouver Sun, the Heart and Stroke Foundation
and Statistics Canada, 2012, by Nila Gopaul
Illustrations by Nola Johnston

Most strokes happen
when a blood clot blocks
the flow of blood going to the brain.

Both children and adults can have strokes.
Each year, there are 50,000 strokes in Canada.
Over 14,000 Canadians die of strokes each year.

Every minute counts
After a stroke, a person loses
about two million brain cells every minute.
That is why it is important to call 9-1-1 immediately
if you think you or someone else is having a stroke.

Some long-term effects of a stroke

  • Having difficulty speaking
    or finding the right words to say
  • Memory loss
  • Weakness on one side of the body

Think you are having a stroke? Call 9-1-1 immediately.
FAST is an easy way to remember the signs of a stroke.
FAST means:

Face droops

Face drooping

Face drooping
Is one side of your face numb, or does it droop?
Smile. Is your smile uneven?

Arm-weakness-signs-of-a-stroke

Arm weakness

Arm weakness
Is one arm weak or numb?
Raise both arms.
Does one arm move down?

Speech difficulty

Speech difficulty

Speech difficulty

Speech difficulty

Speech difficulty
Repeat a simple sentence,
such as “The sky is blue.”
Can you repeat it correctly?

Time2call

Time to call 9-1-1
Call 9-1-1 if you have one or more of these signs.
Write down the time.
Go to the hospital right away.